Communication & Philosophy Faculty Scholarship

Communication and philosophy faculty do more than teach. They research! Their research even enhances the classroom because faculty who actively research stay up on cutting-edge ideas in the profession and share that knowledge with students.

In the past year, faculty members have published journal articles, book chapters, academic commentaries, and edited collections.

Listed below are citations to recent scholarship published by our faculty:

Amber Davisson and Aaron Hess (Eds.). (2017). Theorizing Digital Rhetoric. New York, NY: Routledge.

Amber Davisson. ‘Hallelujah’: Parody, Political Catharsis, and Grieving the 2016 Election with Saturday Night Live. Communication Quarterly, 66(2), 196-213.

Amber Davisson (2017). Cases and Commentaries: Autoplaying Murder. Journal of Media Ethics, 32(2).

Amber Davisson (2017). Hunting the Mother Monster. In P. Booth & I. Menichiello (Eds.), Time Lords & Tribbles, Winchesters & Muggles (pp. 129-130). San Francisco, CA: Blurb.

Jamie Landau and Bethany Keeley-Jonker. “Conductor of public feelings: An affective-emotional rhetorical analysis of Obama’s national eulogy in Tucson.” Quarterly Journal of Speech (2018): 1-23.

Emily McGill. Liberal Neutrality and Gender Justice,” Social Philosophy Today, Vol. 33 (2017): 91-111.

Emily McGill. “Feminist Social and Political Philosophy,” co-authored with Elizabeth Edenberg. in Hay Carol, editor. Philosophy: Feminism. Macmillan Interdisciplinary Handbooks: Philosophy series. Farmington Hills, MI: Macmillan Reference USA/Gale, a Cengage Company, 2017.

Professor Deborah Doubleday Wins Teaching Award!

Professor Deborah Doubleday was recently awarded the Adjunct Faculty Performance Award for her exemplary working teaching COMM 171: Public Speaking. She began her teaching career at Keene State College in 1987. Now in her fiftieth semester, Professor Doubleday stated that she feels honored to receive this award and is thankful that she had a great group of students to work with over the years.

Students describe Professor Doubleday’s class as a transformational experience. As one student explained: “When I came into the course, I was so terrified of public speaking that I used to have anxiety attacks before a speech. Now I actually have grown to like public speaking.” The public speaking course teaches students vital public communication skills in a host of speaking situations, allowing students to gain confidence in self-expression. One student described Professor Doubleday’s dedication to the class, saying that she is “very passionate and caring about what she taught. It was honestly inspiring.”

For Professor Doubleday, winning the award, she said, was “a team effort. Without my students and an observer, it is hard to know how effective you really are.” She sees this award as a means of improving her teaching, stating that: “Conversations around teaching make more effective teachers.”

We are truly lucky to have such effective and dedicated teachers in our department. Congratulation Professor Doubleday!

Communication and Philosophy Faculty Present Their Research

Faculty from the Communication and Philosophy Department have been presenting their research on campus this semester.

Jamie Landau, Associate Professor of Communication, was the invited speaker for International Holocaust Remembrance Day at the Cohen Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies.  Her presentation, titled “Rehumanization and Emotion and Interventions for Injustice,” focused on Rebecca Skloot’s biography of Henrietta Lacks.

Emily McGill-Rutherford, Assistant Professor of Philosophy, spoke at the Keene State College Teach-In. Her presentation, titled “Grab Them By the Uterus: Reproductive Rights and Freedom,” discussed the current legal status of abortion and birth control access in the United States.

Dr. Davisson in the news

This summer, Assistant Professor of Communication Amber Davisson has been in the news!

On July 2, National Public Radio interviewed Dr. Davisson for an article about the presidential election and fan fiction. Dr. Davisson is an expert in digital communication, politics, and popular culture. As Dr. Davisson explained to NPR, “We’re talking about voters who have a really emotional attachment to candidates,” much like people are fans of Star Trek or Britney Spears.

About a month prior to that on June 14, Keene State College’s Office of Marketing and Communications interviewed Dr. Davisson for an article about her new co-edited book on digital ethics and how she teaches students about digital technology. For example, Dr. Davisson said, “We wanted to develop a book for the classroom. We really focused on controversies and case studies, to spark class discussion.”

 

 

 

 

Faculty research enhances the classroom

Digital Ethics book coverCommunication and philosophy faculty do more than teach. They research! Their research even enhances the classroom because faculty who actively research stay up on cutting-edge ideas in the profession and share that knowledge with students.

For example, just over this past academic year, faculty in the Department of Communication and Philosophy at Keene State College published several scholarly articles, wrote book chapters and book reviews, and even edited academic journals and books. Research topics range from health communication, feminism, and childlessness to post-Holocaust and digital ethics.

Listed below are citations to recent scholarship published by our faculty:

  • Davisson, A. (2016). Passing around women’s bodies online: Identity, privacy, and free speech on Reddit (pp. 44-57). In A. Davisson & P. Booth (Eds.) Controversies in digital ethics. New York: Bloomsbury.
  • Landau, J. (2016, in press). Feeling rhetorical critics: Another affective-emotional field method for rhetorical studies. In S. L. McKinnon, R. Asen, K. R. Chavez, & R. G. Howard (Eds.) Text + field: Innovations in rhetorical method. State College, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press.
  • Lee, S. (2016, in press). Primo Levi’s gray zone: Implications for post-Holocaust ethics. Holocaust and Genocide Studies.

Faculty mentor for student’s summer research fellowship

SURF- Stewart Akkoor Summer 2016This summer, Dr. Chitra Akkoor will be busy mentoring Mary Kate Stewart as she conducts original research about communicating learning disabilities. In fact, Mary Kate is the winner of the college’s Bruce Levine Mellion ’69 Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF)!

The number of college students across the country with all forms of disabilities is increasing. Since 2013, Mary Kate and Dr. Akkoor have interviewed 43 faculty and 16 students on campus about how professors accommodate and communicate about students with learning disabilities.

For the SURF, Mary Kate will continue to collect data by interviewing experts in the area of disabilities and staff in the Office of Disability Services at Keene State College. Mary Kate will also apply interpersonal and intercultural communication theories to analyze the interviews. Finally, she will design a professional development workshop for faculty about how to better work with students with learning disabilities, with plans to launch this workshop during the Fall 2016 semester.

Congratulations to Dr. Akkoor and Mary Kate Stewart!